A characteristic of Dorrie's work went beyond the design of the jewellery to giving each piece a name. 

"She has designed rings, necklaces, clips, and earrings___the earrings being perhaps the most handsome of all, for , as Miss Nossiter believes earrings are always "in". And she gives her works of art such charming appellations as "Quiet evening," "Stamboul," and "Treasure Trove." Birmingham Mail May, 1935  

In the Cairns Post's Mayfair Notebook in June 1939 comes the following from Philine

"Handwrought jewellery is Dorrie Nossiter's chosen form of art. Just as famous dressmakers invent names for their creations, this artist names her jewellery. At Walker's Gallery, she shows a four-row pearl necklace, banded with sapphires, which she calls, "She Done Him Wrong" and a ring in fire opals and dark green tourmalines, "Robin Hood." "A Bicycle Made for Two" are twin circular black and crystal dress clips; "The Heavenly Twins," two little Chineses princesses carved m mauve jade, one at each end of a double amethyst. A topaz brooch has the intriguing name of "Prelude to Adventure." Philine 1939

The next task is to try and work out from these descriptions, the one postcard we have from her Walker's Gallery exhibition and any that may be with Dorrie's pieces which pieces go with different names to try to recapture the meanings behind her work and their naming.

About Us

This site has been created by David Bryson, Dorrie's Great Nephew with contributions from Jeanne Bryson, Dorrie's Niece.

I also have a number of other websites including my photographic library at http://photolibrary.cladonia.co.uk.

Riverbank

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Name: David Bryson
Add: 70 Osmaston Road, Derby, DE1 2HZ 
Email: d.bryson@cladonia.co.uk
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